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Luca Richardson
Luca Richardson

Oro Blanco


An oroblanco, oro blanco (white gold), pomelit (Israel) or sweetie[1] (Citrus maxima Merr. C. Paradisi Macf.) is a sweet seedless citrus hybrid fruit similar to grapefruit. It is often referred to as oroblanco grapefruit.




Oro Blanco


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Oroblanco was developed as a cross between a diploid acidless pomelo and a seedy white tetraploid grapefruit, resulting in a triploid seedless fruit that is less acidic and less bitter than the grapefruit.[2]


The oroblanco was patented by the University of California in 1981 after its development by Robert Soost and James W. Cameron[3][4][5][6][7] at that university's citrus experiment station in Riverside, California.[8] The nine-year project began in 1958 and led to a series of test plantings before a successful variation was refined.[2]


Oroblancos are either round- or oval-shaped with a thicker rind than grapefruit. When eaten, an oroblanco lacks bitterness associated with grapefruits and is rather sweet, even when the outer peel is still green, but the white membranes separating the fleshy segments are bitter and usually discarded.[9]


Oroblanco grapefruits are a hybrid fruit native to California. It was created at the University of California in the middle of the 20th century. It grows on hardy trees similar to lemon, lime and grapefruit trees, with shiny leaves and relatively short overall tree height.Today, oroblanco grapefruits are cultivated in the United States in California and Florida, Australia, Israel, and Japan. Oroblanco fruits come into season in the fall and remain available through late winter.


Oroblanco is a hybrid fruit native to California where it was created at the University of California in the middle of the 20th century. It grows on hardy trees that look similar to lemon, lime and grapefruit trees, with shiny leaves and relatively short overall tree height.Today, oroblanco grapefruits are cultivated in the United States in California and Florida, Australia, Israel, and Japan.


Like many citrus fruits, oroblanco is welcome in just about any recipe where sweet, sour citrus flavor is needed. Use it in desserts to brighten up creams, candies, cakes and pies. Grate zest or squeeze the juice into sauces, marinades and soups. Use oroblanco to impart mildly acidic sweetness to rich meat dishes or delicate seafood preparations. The culinary uses of oroblanco are only limited by your imagination.


As a citrus fruit, oroblanco offers many ways to enjoy its fragrant, sweet citrus fruit. Use the fruit and the zest in raw applications to brighten up sauces, seafood, salads, soups, desserts and more! Cook it into citrusy candies, jams, or even rich meats like pork and beef. Oroblanco is an incredibly versatile fruit that imparts intense grapefruit flavor without even a hint of bitterness.


The citrus family is responsible for making our favorite drinks even more delicious, and oroblanco is no exception. This relatively new fruit is a twist on a grapefruit in that it has all the flavor with none of the bitterness or acidity. The oroblanco adds sweet grapefruit flavor to just about any drink where a sour-sweet citrus twist is welcome. Add oroblanco to soft drinks and cocktails from enhanced water to teas, cocktails and fresh juices for a completely new fruit drinking experience!


There are two common ways to prepare oroblanco fruit for freezing. First, remove the peel and separate or cut the fruit into slices. Lay wax paper down on a cookie sheet and arrange the fruit with space between each piece. Once frozen, store the fruit in an airtight container in the freezer for up to a year. Another option is to squeeze the juice from the fruit and store in the freezer in an airtight container or ice cube tray.


Good pups love a sweet citrus snack every once in a while! Dogs can eat oroblanco fruit in small quantities, since this type of fruit can cause upset tummies in some dogs. Over at FruitStand, we love sharing fruit with our wet-nosed friends, so we encourage you to clear the safety of any new fruits or veggies with your veterinarian before offering them your pooch.


Even though oroblanco fruit is light in color, if it comes in contact with light colored fabrics it can leave a brownish stain. Fruit Geek 101: Keep a portable stain stick on hand for impromptu fruit feasts. Quickly treating a fruit juice spot greatly increases your chances of avoiding a stain.


Oroblanco is a hybrid of 2N acidless pummelo and 4N seedy white grapefruit developed at the University of California, Riverside by Drs. Cameron and Soost. The cross was made in 1958 and the Oroblanco selection was released in 1980. Patent held by the University of California.


The Oroblanco grapefruit is actually a cross between a white fleshed grapefruit and a pomelo. The product is a sweet seedless fruit that is easy to grow, even in areas of the country that do not get as much heat or sun hours. The flowers of this plant are oversized and intensely fragrant.This white fleshed grapefruit is great for coastal areas. Grafted onto semi-dwarf rootstock.


Preferring to grow in subtropical and warm climates to hot valleys, oroblanco trees are hardy and they can tolerate near freezing conditions. The fruit matures early, but retains its freshness on the tree throughout its peak season. The pumelo-grapefruit hybrid is grown in California, Florida, Australia, and Israel. 041b061a72


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