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Ezekiel Turner
Ezekiel Turner

Kiftsgate Rose Buy


Extremely vigorous, award-winning Rosa filipes 'Kiftsgate' is a fast-growing, large rambler rose with huge sprays of highly fragrant, semi-double, creamy-white flowers, adorned with deep yellow stamens. Produced in abundance on long thorny stems bearing pointed, light green leaves, the flowers are followed by crops of decorative, vivid, orange-red hips in the fall, extending the season of interest. Sturdy and disease resistant, this rampant rambling rose is ideal for covering unsightly buildings, large walls or scrambling through big trees. A giant rose for those that have the room for it!




kiftsgate rose buy


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Debit and credit cards are deducted at the time of your order. No roses will be dispatched without prior payment. We reserve the right to change prices without notice. Current prices are those indicated and supersede all previous prices.


We may wish to undertake limited direct marketing in the future which may include sending a catalogue/list of roses or a newsletter. This may be done electronically, or by post. We may also like to tell you occasionally about offers/products that you may be interested in by direct e-mail. No marketing communication will be issued without your permission. Marketing preference can be updated at any time by logging into your account or by emailing parksidenursery@hotmail.co.uk


Pale green leaves that are bronzy when young. A strong, vigorous grower. Clusters of small single white flowers borne late in the season. Small orange hips in autumn. Makes the perfect rose for rambling through a tree and over old buildings. It's an incredible sight when in full flower. Will tolerate shade. Medium fragrance.


Containerised roses are available throughout the year (although there are more available during the summer months) and are roses that we have planted into containers during the winter months when the plants are dormant. If purchasing a container rose early in the year it is advisable to wait until early June before planting out into the garden. This is to give the roots system a chance to establish without damaging the young fibrous roots. In summer months containerised roses must be watered daily to ensure good health and maximum blooms. The advantage of buying a rose in a pot is that you can select the plant yourself during a visit to our nursery and gardens, giving you the opportunity to see the rose in flower prior to purchasing. Containerised roses are usually available for delivery within 3 - 5 days unless otherwise stated.


Throughout the winter months, from November to March, the roses are dormant and can be cut back and safely handled in bare root form. Many established rose gardeners call this the peak time for purchasing and planting roses, as a rose planted in the winter has many months to put down a great root structure to support the blooms and the plant for years to come. Most roses planted during the bare root season will put out a great display of blooms the same year. Bare root roses are obviously live plants so do need fairly immediate treatment upon arrival. This can be difficult in times of heavy frost or snow. It is prudent in these conditions to prepare an area in which to heel in the roses. More advice on heeling in can be found within our planting advice pages and a full set of planting instructions will come with your rose. We would never advise buying a pre-packed rose from a supermarket for you have no idea how long they have been packaged and may well have dried out. Bare root roses are available to order throughout the year and are normally delivered between November 1st and March 31st.


These should always be hard pruned at the time of planting, before they are placed in the hole is the logical time. Even the most rampant of ramblers will benefit from this treatment as it encourages basal growth, from which the plant will make its shape. Climbers, ramblers and shrub roses should be reduced to about six inches, bush roses to about four inches.


A correctly planted rose will need to have the union and first inch or so of branches below soil level. This is to reduce the risk of suckers developing and damage by wind-rock.For a bare root rose the hole should be wide enough to allow the roots to be spread out and deep enough so that the base of the stems are just covered. We recommend using a good quality compost, like John Innes No 3, especially if planting roses into pots. We would also advise adding a proprietary rose food or bone meal into the base of the hole. A handful is enough and this should be mixed in with the soil there to avoid root scorch. A little powdered food can also be sprinkled onto the removed soil before it is returned.


The bare root rose should now be held with one hand at the right depth with the roots spread out, whilst the first of the soil is returned, either by hand or with a spade. When approximately half the hole is full the rose can be left alone and the soil firmed in by foot. The remainder of the soil can then be returned and firmed in the same way.


Much of the bare root planting instructions also apply for a rose bought in a container, with the first inch or so of the branches below soil level, and the hole wide enough for the root ball. To reduce the risk of damaging the root system we would not advocate the teasing out of the roots. The plant should be young enough to allow the roots to break through by themselves. If purchased early in the year it is wise to leave the rose in its pot until early June to give the roots time to establish.


Container roses are delivered throughout the year. If you receive your container rose at the start of the year then it is likely to have been recently potted into its container. We would therefore strongly recommend waiting until early June before removing your rose from its pot. This is to allow the young fibrous roots time to establish and knit together with the surrounding soil, which will minimise any chance of damage.


'Belinda's Blush' is a color sport of one of our favorite roses, 'Belinda's Dream'. Similar in size and growth habit, this rose offers fragrant, full blooms of a light, creamy pink that are excellent for cutting. Canes free of thorns are always appreciated.


'Bliss' is another great rose bred by Kordes. The double-cupped, fruity-scented blooms are a lovely creamy pink with an apricot center. The nicely shaped shrub will be compact to four feet and has proved itself to be cold tolerant and disease resistant. 'Bliss' can be used either as a small border planting or in containers.


Teddy Roosevelt made 'Duchesse de Brabant' his favorite, often wearing a bud or flower as a boutonniere. It is very nearly our greatest favorite, too. The cupped pink flowers have a cabbagey roundness to them, as if they were picked from a luscious old rose painting.


It is occasionally grown as an ornamental plant in gardens, valued for its fragrance and unusually large clusters of flowers compared to other roses, sometimes also for its size, and its ability to climb into trees. For those that have the room for it to reach its full potential, this is a superb variety.


The gardens, famed for its roses,[1] are the creation of three generations of women gardeners. Started by Heather Muir in the 1920s, continued by Diany Binny from 1950 and now looked after by Anne Chambers and her husband.[2] Kiftsgate Court is now the home of the Chambers family.


The hard tennis court, now the modern water garden, was made in the 1930s and the yew hedge was planted around it at the same time. During the war the tennis court, which required continual watering and upkeep, was allowed to become derelict and in 1955 there was a wonderful display of seedling roses and Scotch firs growing on it, which Mrs J.B. Muir was very grieved to see go, when it was resurfaced.


Each rose bush has grown to its maximum proportions and to the conventional gardener these proportions will come as a revelation. Yet despite the luxuriance of Kiftsgate it is a garden upon which an extremely firm hand and a very discerning eye have been kept. There is nothing of the wilderness here and one is immediately conscious that everything is in its place and is there for a definite purpose. That purpose is to produce a series of pictures in colour that are rich but never glaring. They are the colours I associate with fine tapestry.


The gardens are well known for the famous Kiftsgate rose, a scented climbing rose, which is shade-tolerant and very vigorous. It is claimed that the Rosa filipes 'Kiftsgate' is the largest rose in Britain measuring 80 feet (24 m) x 90 feet x 50 feet (15 m) high at last measurement, as reported on the Kiftsgate website. It was planted in 1938 and named by Graham Stuart Thomas in 1951. The same official website says that it would be even larger were it not cut back, and the owners fear for the integrity of the beech tree which it has colonised owing to the weight of its foliage.


The RHS Award of Garden Merit-winning cultivar 'Kiftsgate' was first noticed at Kiftsgate Court Gardens in the Cotswolds, but its origin is unknown.[1] The original plant dates from 1938 and the cultivar was named by Graham Stuart Thomas in 1951.[1] It is particularly vigorous, with clusters of scented flowers up to 45 centimetres (18 in) diameter, and tolerant of shade, a necessary attribute for a tree climber. The original plant of Rosa filipes 'Kiftsgate' is said to be the largest rose in Britain, measuring 80 feet (24 m) x 90 feet (27 m) x 50 feet (15 m) high.[1] The same official website claims that were it not cut back regularly, the rose would eventually cause the destruction of the large copper beech tree into which it has climbed.


Rambling rose with clusters of single pale creamy white flowers which repeat flower through the summer. Extremely large growing habit which is ideal to train along long fence lines, up large walls, over large structures or up trees.


If your rose is for a gift, please write your message on the "Cart" page and we'll hand write it to send with each rose. If you can't find where to enter the message, don't worry just email us at roses@henrystreet.co.uk and we'll include it with your order. 041b061a72


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